Sunday, January 14, 2018

Dark Mansion - Glow in the Dark Museum

I got a free ticket to the Dark Mansion when I visited the Interactive Museum. Since it's free, I might as well pay it a visit.

The concept is similar to the Interactive Museum, but instead of artworks, they played with lighting. Photos taken at exactly the same spot gave different affects. It's a lot of fun to see how the photos turned out. I didn't know it's possible to do something like this. You must go and experience this awesomeness.

This is one of the coolest place ever.

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Hijabi mermaid, bebeh!

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Saturday, December 09, 2017

Penang Interactive Museum

I wondered how a museum can be interactive. Well, at the Penang Interactive Museum, you can pose with the artworks and it gives the impression that you're a part of the artwork. It really is very cool. Children and adults alike would enjoy themselves enormously here.

The friendly staff will help you to take photos. They will even advice you how to pose. You must visit this place when you're in Penang.

You don't scare me!

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Henna time.

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Sunday, November 26, 2017

Penang War Museum

I thought the Penang War Museum is just a museum with war relics placed in it. I couldn't be more wrong. The museum is actually a fortress built by the British in the 1930s. It was captured by the Japanese during Word War 2 and was used to detain and torutre prisoners of war. After the war, the fortress was abandoned, and for 60 years, forgotten, until a group of historians excavated and restored the fortress.

The fortress was constructed on 20 acres of land — complete with underground tunnels, ventilation shafts, ammunition bunkers, canon firing bays, observation tower, sleeping quarter etc.

If you love history, this place is a treasure. I took almost an hour walking around the fortress. Wondered what life was like for the solders.

Visitors are allowed to go into one of the tunnels. If your phone doesn't have flashlight function, bring a flashlight. As I walked in the tunnel, I could feel a breeze flowing in. After more than half a century, the ventilation shaft still works perfectly.

Penang War Museum is a restored fortress built by the British in the 1930s.

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Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Penang National Park

I went not knowing what to expect. In hindsight, I should've done my homework. I took the trail to Kerachut Beach, which took a little over an hour. I thought hiking in the park is like taking a stroll. I couldn't be more wrong. Parts of the trail were quite challenging as it went up hill (or may be I'm getting a bit old for this). If you're not fit (as in you haven't exercised in the past seven years), I wouldn't recommend you go hiking here.

Check carefully before you grab a tree or branch for support to make sure there aren't any ants or other insects there. Insect bites can be painful.

Kerachut Beach was very beautiful. It's a pity swimming is forbidden (there was a huge sign warning peopel not to swim). There is no life guard and there was a case where a swimmer drowned. Plus, jelly fish is plentiful, I was told.

Kerachut Beach is a bit of a no man's land. Apart from the turtle sanctuary, there was nothing else there. Even though it's small, the sanctuary is worth visiting.

From Kerachut Beach, I took a boat to Monkey Beach (cost RM150). There are many activities you can do here — swimming, fishing, jet ski, ATV etc. There are also a few food stalls.

The welcome committee.

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The trail became increasingly challenging and I put away my camera.

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Penang Batik Factory

Until recently, I didn't know there is a batik factory in Penang (FB Page). After all, it is the east cost states that are known for producing beautiful batik. This is definitely the place to go to spend money. He he he... And it's worth every cent you spend.

Visitors are offered a tour of the factory. I highly recommend you take the tour. Watching the workers painting batik is quite fascinating. Batik produced at the factory are sold only at its shop. There are batik dresses, pareos, blouses, shirts, scarves etc. It's hard not to get carried away.

Painted batik.

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Painted batik - work in progress.

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Batik sarong.

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Saturday, September 30, 2017

Tropical Spice Garden

If you love nature, you'll love the Spice Garden. After paying for your ticket, you are given an audio guide with 4 language selection — Malay, English, Arabic and Japanese. The plants are marked with a number and you simply enter the number you're interested in to get more information about what you're looking at.

Walking leisurely around the garden would take about an hour. Longer if you really want to learn about the plants and spices there.

There is a cooking school where you can learn how to use spices in your food. So if cooking is your thing, it's worth spending some money for cooking lessons. Advanced booking is required.

The gift shop was amazing. There are various types of spices for you to buy. I hoarded some essential oils and soaps. After I paid, I was told that I can also buy their product online. Duh, If I knew I wouldn't have bought so much that day!

The audio guide. 4 language selection. The plants are numbered. You press the number to get more info.about a plant.

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The pond near the entrance.

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I've no idea what this is about.

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Step on the wrong tile and you'll fall into a bottomless pit.

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Sunday, September 24, 2017

Bukit Bendera (Penang Hill)

A friend told me that the queue for tickets and train is often longer in the morning, so I decided to go in the evening. Another reason for doing that was because I wanted to watch the sunset and the night view.

I arrived at about 6 p.m. and there were only a few people queuing at the ticket counter. I didn't have to spend much time queuing. A return ticket cost only RM10 (adult).

If you're going during school holiday or weekend or public holiday, I recommend that you buy the ticket online to avoid the long queue. It might even be worth it to pay extra for a fast lane ticket.

I was told that you could also take a four-wheel drive up the hill and that would cost RM160. If you're more adventurous, hiking would take about 30 minutes.

The weather was a bit cloudy, so the sunset wasn't as spectacular as I hoped, but the night view was still amazing.

Malaysia's flag flying proud. This was a few days before independence day.

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A lonesome tree.

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Dark Mansion - Glow in the Dark Museum

I got a free ticket to the Dark Mansion when I visited the Interactive Museum . Since it's free, I might as well pay it a visit. The ...